Introducing the 168 Time Budget

The fact that most of us budget money and not time has always intrigued me. Money is an elastic resource that is figuratively infinite. Time, however, is finite; we can’t make more of it, once it is gone, it is gone.

168 hours a week. That is all we have.

You, me, Elon Musk, Oprah Winfrey, Warren Buffet, Elizabeth Gilbert, Jack Ma, Malala Yousafzai and every other being on this pale blue dot has 168 hours a week to realize greatness. And even at that, the number of weeks available to us are also counting down. Time stops for no one.

So I ask you, how do you spend your time?

Prior to diving into my 168 Time Budget concept, I would like to introduce the following short story to create the right context. If you have read it before, I encourage you to re-read it now for full effect.

A teacher walks into a classroom and sets a glass jar on the table. She silently places large rocks in the jar until no more can fit. She asks the class if the jar is full and they agree it is. She says, “Really,” and pulls out a pile of small pebbles, adding them to the jar, shaking it slightly until they fill the spaces between the rocks. She asks again, “Is the jar full?” They agree. So next, she pours sand into the jar, filling the space between the pebbles and asks the question again. This time, the class is divided, some feeling that the jar is obviously full, but others are wary of another trick. Before they answer, she reaches for a pitcher of water and fills the jar to the brim, and asks, “If this jar is your life, what does this experiment show you?” A bold student replies, “No matter how busy you think you are, you can always take on more.” “That is one view,” she replies.

Then she looks out at the class making eye contact with everyone, “The rocks represent the BIG things in your life – what you will value at the end of your life – your family, your partner, your health, fulfilling your hopes and dreams. The pebbles are the other things in your life that give it meaning, like your job, your house, your hobbies, your friendships. The sand and water represent the ‘small stuff’ that fills our time, like checking social media, watching TV or running errands.”

Looking out at the class again, she asks, “Can you imagine what would happen to life if we had started with the water, the sand or the pebbles?”

Like so many, I too have let water and sand fill every crevice at many intervals in my life; not realizing that I left no time or energy for what really mattered to me. With distractions everywhere, I learned over the years to become mindful, vigilant and a fervent guardian of my time. I also started to gain an acute awareness of the elements that bring me joy. By applying traditional money budgeting techniques to time management, I now invest more of myself in things that make me happy. The time budget I created for myself is aptly named 168.

My 168 Time Budget concept is quite simple.

  1. Identify the “big rocks” that create great JOY in your life.
    • Health including sleep & exercise, family, partner, life goals, key relationships.
  2. List and prioritize the “pebbles” that add significance & meaning to your life.
    • Work including paid & volunteering, community, friends, hobbies
  3. Allocate a range of hours towards each rock & pebble totaling ~160 hours.
    • Leaving a few spare hours for sand & water is key, otherwise, the 168 budget won’t function in reality. Rigidity will derail new habit adhesion.
  4. Calculate the % of time each line item represents of 168 to check if you are indeed putting enough time towards the rocks, then the pebbles.
  5. Lastly, be kind to yourself if you derail slightly from week to week.
    • Social media, random articles or phone calls will likely steal precious minutes totaling in wasted hours but such is life.
    • Acknowledge, accept and aim to do better but most importantly, forgive yourself and move onwards and upwards!

Here is an example from my life:

  • 168 hours per week; totaling 61 320 hours in 2018.
    • 49 hours / 29% : 7hrs of sleep per night x 7 nights
    • 60 hours / 36% : 10hrs of work + 2 hrs of commute x 5 days
    • 10-20 hours / 6-12% : TEDxMontreal meetings & work
    • 8-20 hours / 5-12% : Time with partner & extended family
    • 10 hours / 6% : “Me time” to relax, read, write & let my mind wander
    • 8-12 hours / 5-7% : hanging out or speaking with friends /colleagues/ networks in person
    • 8-15 hours / 5-9% : conversing with friends online & social media
    • 3-5 hours / 2-3% : exercise (running, biking, other)
  • Cumulating in a range btwn 156 – 191 hours that ebbs & flows depending on the time of year.

The level of precision is up to you. It does not have to be granular down to the minute; the principle behind my 168 Time Budget is that it creates awareness around the time we spend (or don’t spend) on our life priorities. For those who desire precision, you can track Actual versus Budgeted time in a nifty time-tracking app on your phone but I have found this more useful as a high-level mental guide.

With finite time and finite energy during our time here, I hope my 168 idea will help you find time to invest in yourself, your dreams and your worldly ambitions. Each minute, hour and day, when channeled into purposeful actions can spark great change within us and ignite impactful change in others and the world.

So be great, be purposeful and be you, 168 hours at a time!

time flies

Zero Inbox: Stop the Yo-Yo diet.

Current email weight: 700+ unread

Goal email weight: Zero

Attack plan:

1. Educate ourselves on how to eat email better – consume all forms of advicetips & tricks on how to better manage out the junk to focus on more quality email.

2. Create a realistic plan with SMART principles to achieve and maintain goal email weight, which we equate to being more effective.

3. Execute plan.

Simple. Right?

Wrong. Something always tends to go horribly wrong in Step 3. We oscillate painfully between our current and goal email weights until the Yo-Yo diet is in full effect. With this comes the volatile emotions of celebration, pride, disappoint, and guilt. Ultimately this exerts a toll on our self-esteem.

So why do we do this?

Because zero feels so sweet – as desirable an idea as fitting back into “that” pair of old jeans.

But, zero is a short lived state. It is a temporary illusion of control. It is not comfortable. The waistline is tight and just one excess email can cause the zipper to strain or even the button to burst. Either way, the fabric is cutting into your skin. But here you are, at ZERO.

Bravo! You’re a Zero 😛

But not for long. You barely have enough time to boast to others about having achieved this elusive goal and presto you are no longer there. And so the Yo-Yo efforts continue.

We need to KILL the idea of THE ZERO INBOX.

emailzeroninja

This unrealistic goal is as toxic as the svelte models on covers of GQ and Vogue. It causes us to invest profound amounts of time and energy towards binge purging, extreme filing and often an overdose on automatic filters and rules. None of which are healthy.

I invite you to stop the Yo-Yo email diet and to set a more realistic email goal for yourself, one that will stop the email anorexia or bulimia we inevitably end up doing to ourselves to attain and maintain Zero. But first ask yourself if that goal is even all that important? Are we saving lives with our emails? I hope not. And if there is a do-or-die situation, I encourage you to call or text me. Immediately. Avoiding the email cemetery altogether.

So here goes take two…

Current email weight: 700+ unread

Goal email weight: <150 unread with all urgent emails processed.

Lastly, I am now going to find that old pair of jeans and donate them. I will also chuck all my Vogue magazines. No use in holding a goal over myself that is no longer relevant, realistic or even mine to begin with. Life is simply too short for this bullshit.

Have a wonderful day.